Hollywood: Two more shoes waiting to drop

Beyond the casting couch for adult actors, two more shoes are waiting to drop—organized pedophilic abuse and sex-trafficking and Jewish supremacy, both of which extend far beyond Hollywood.

In spiritual terms, these are demonic forces that defile our society as well as our individual minds. They seduce us with pleasure and then frighten us when we try to break free.

Pope Francis said something about this on Friday:

The demons… start being part of the man’s life. With their ideas and inspirations, they help the man to live better and entering his life and heart and start changing him from within, but quietly without making any noise. (Source)

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10/16/17 related: What #HarveyWeinstein Needs to Say to Bring Down the #Hollyweird Hypocrites Who’ve Disowned Him

10/17/17 related: An undercover reporter secretly records how the Israeli Embassy directs local groups

10/17/17: Former Miramax Screenwriter Posts Harvey Weinstein Mea Culpa: “Everybody Fu*king Knew” BTW guys, everybody also knows about the Jewish supremacy. Here’s a view of how deep that goes: Mountebank’s Monster and His Mom: a peculiar resurrection. Jodie Foster needs to read this book.

10/22/17: The third shoe dropping: 38 women have come forward to accuse director James Toback of sexual harassment

Buddhism and ethical signalling

Buddhism is very much a system of ethics. Buddhist practice is founded on the Five Precepts of refraining from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, and the irresponsible use of alcohol.

In most Buddhist traditions, these precepts are often taught as if they were fundamental to the workings of the universe. But how can morality be fundamental to the workings of the universe? Why does morality even matter to human beings?

If we think of a human being as a signalling system, we may be able to show that ethical thoughts and behavior are of fundamental importance to the system itself.

Human signalling systems signal internally, within themselves, and externally, toward other people. Our most important signalling system is the one we share with that person who is most important to us, our mate or best friend. Let’s confine our discussion to this sort of primary signalling system.

If I lie to my partner or cheat her, I may gain something outside of our shared signaling system, but that signalling system will suffer. And when that shared system suffers, my own internal signalling system will also suffer because it will contain errors. It will no longer be in its optimal state. Similarly, if she lies to me or cheats me, our mutual signalling system will become less than optimal as will both of our individual, or internal, signalling systems.

My own signalling system cannot grow or become optimal without my partner treating me with the best ethical behavior she can muster. And the same is true for her with respect to me. And we both know this.

We would be good to each other anyway, but it is helpful to see that our being good to each other has a very practical foundation—it assures us optimal performance of our mutual and internal signalling systems.

FIML practice is designed to provide partners with a clear and reasonably objective means to communicate honestly with each other. FIML practice will gradually optimize communication between partners by making it much clearer and more honest. In doing this, it will also optimize the operations of their mutual and individual signalling systems.

To my knowledge, there is nothing like FIML in any Buddhist tradition. But if I try to read FIML into the tradition, I may be able to find something similar in the way monks traveled together in pairs for much of the year. I don’t know what instructions the Buddha may have given them or how they spoke to each other, but it may be that they did a practice with each other similar to FIML practice.

In any case, if we view human being as a signalling system, we may be able to claim that clear signalling—that is, ethical signalling—is fundamental to the optimization of that system.

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First posted 02/03/13, revised 09/25/17

The worst thing you can do

The worst thing you can do is trick someone into using their conscience to cause harm.

This not only causes said harm but also undermines the person’s moral sense, their trust in their own moral feelings. To say nothing of their trust in others.

This sort of mental jujitsu attacks the victim in the most important part of their mind, the part that guides them forward in a good direction.

Our ability to tell the difference between wholesome and unwholesome mental states is one power we never want to lose and never want to harm or undermine in others.

Examine closely all appeals to your conscience. Each one must be analyzed for hypocrisy, mendacity, who really benefits, and what the long-term consequences would be.